Dr. Ron Brooks, Researcher - Painted Turtle Research in Algonquin Provincial Park
  Researchers
Dr. Ron Brooks, Researcher
   
 

Painted Turtle Research in Algonquin Provincial Park

 
Current research includes the life history of turtles, particularly the relationships among age at first reproduction, reproductive output, body size and growth rates and longevity.
 

The major focus of Dr. Ron Brooks' current research is life history of turtles, particularly the relationships among the age when they can start having offspring, how many offspring they have, body size and growth rates and how long they live.

He is also investigating how temperature determines the sex of Painted Turtle hatchlings. This is known as temperature dependent sex determination (TDSD). Dr. Brooks is also examining if female turtles can control the sex of their offspring from year to year by where they build their nests.

Dr. Brooks is interested in the social behaviour of small mammals, particularly infanticide and parental care, and the evolution of these behaviour patterns.

Research Facility
Ron Brooks and his graduate students are based out of the Wildlife Research Station located on Sasajewun Lake in Algonquin Provincial Park.



Suggested Reading
Educators: Learn more about Algonquin’s habitats, download readings and worksheets from the Educator Resources section of the Web Site, or you may also learn more through the following publications:

The Reptiles and Amphibians of Algonquin Provincial Park
Completely revised, and for the first time using coloured photographs, the new edition of Reptiles and Amphibians of Algonquin Provincial Park does more than merely introduce readers to the 31 species of turtles, snakes, frogs and salamanders that have been recorded in Ontario's most famous provincial park. Numerous sidebars delve into the fascinating biology and life histories of Park reptiles and amphibians, drawing heavily on over 25 years of research conducted in the Park by the book's senior author, Dr. Ron Brooks of the University of Guelph. Perhaps the best small book on these subjects ever written in Canada.


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